Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Are you in a "live-in" relationship?

Are you in a "live-in" relationship? Recently, my young friend was asked this question. It was asked by none other than his dad. My young friend reacted promptly to this question. He fell off the chair!

While my young friend is still analyzing how his father arrived at this ridiculous conclusion, I know the reason. He has only himself to blame. Check his Facebook account. Why does he have more girls than guys as friends? Why does he comment whenever a girl post something even if it is silly? I will pardon him for the above two sins. After all, he is a guy. The third sin is unforgivable. He should never have done it in the first place. He has known his father's intentions for a long time. Then, why did he accept his dad's friend request on Facebook?

After a tiring Skype session with his dad on girls and relationship, my young friend did the right thing. He removed his dad from his friend list on Facebook.



13 comments:

  1. He should have known his dad better!

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  2. well.. in my case my dad as well as my bro is added to me ;)

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  3. Strange, today, I too removed a lot of so called 'friends' from Facebook.
    Of course not because I am being spied.
    Even if young boys / girls have no parents as their friends, this is what parents have to ask their children today. Times have changed.

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  4. @Radha - He thought he knew! But this was surprising for him!

    @Madhulika - he he he.

    @Rama - The parents can also ask it in a different way. They could always ask if there is someone he is interested in or if he is in a relationship. Why go directly to the "live-in" relationship?

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  5. @Everlost - Or the inquisitive dad! :)

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  6. Parents as friends ? Naaah ! Many parents do this to spy on their kids .

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  7. I would ask directly only, no point in beating about the bush.

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  8. @Kavita - Think of it in a different perspective. If the children don't feel comfortable telling you what is going on in their life, how do we help them?

    @Rama - The best approach is to be direct. In the case I mentioned, the son is an adult. There is no point in "shock-n-awe" technique in this case!

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  9. We are friends of our children in FB., but the friendship request came from them not from us.
    Anyway, what is there to spy or hide for they are both adults. In fact they don't even use fB as much as I use it.

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  10. your friend learnt it hard way :D
    now dad must be devising other ways :)

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  11. @Sujatha - He might be! But, I do not have the latest updates from the young friend. :)

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